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Bibliography

The bibliography includes all references from the book “Evolution’s Witness: How Eyes Evolved” as well as additional references that were not included in the book.  These additional references relate to the text as well, but were not included in the initial bibliography. The references are ordered by the chapter to which they apply.

 

Ch1

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17.      Claire, L., et al., Developmental expression of transcription factor genes in a demosponge: insights into the origin of metazoan multicellularity. Evol Dev, 2006. 8(2): p. 150-173.

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38.      Harris, W.A., Pax-6: where to be conserved is not conservative. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 1997. 94(6): p. 2098-100.

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43.      Huber, C. and G. Wächtershäuser, α-Hydroxy and α-Amino Acids Under Possible Hadean, Volcanic Origin-of-Life Conditions. Science, 2006. 314(5799): p. 630-632.

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53.      Levy, O., et al., Light-responsive cryptochromes from a simple multicellular animal, the coral Acropora millepora. Science, 2007. 318(5849): p. 467-70.

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57.      Melyan, Z., et al., Addition of human melanopsin renders mammalian cells photoresponsive. Nature, 2005. 433(7027): p. 741-745.

58.      Montgomery, B.L., Sensing the light: photoreceptive systems and signal transduction in cyanobacteria. Molecular Microbiology, 2007. 64(1): p. 16-27.

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Ch2

1.         Boucher, Y. and W.F. Doolittle, Biodiversity: Something new under the sea. Nature, 2002. 417(6884): p. 27-28.

2.         Cavalier-Smith, T., Cell evolution and Earth history: stasis and revolution. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, 2006. 361(1470): p. 969-1006.

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6.         Di Giulio, M., The origin of genes could be polyphyletic. Gene, 2008. 426(1-2): p. 39-46.

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Ch3

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Accomodation Section

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